6 Reasons for Getting Into the Word of God

2 Timothy 3:16-17 “All Scripture is breathed out by God and profitable for teaching, for reproof, for correction, and for training in righteousness, that the man of God may be competent, equipped for every good work.”

1. Nourishment and growth. The Bible was not merely written for our information, but for our transformation.  While the Bible is an inspired revelation from the living God, it requires our response before it can have an impact upon our lives. Scripture is indeed “profitable for teaching,” but its profit does not stop on the level of doctrine; it must move from the head to the heart to accomplish the purpose for which it was given.

God loves us and desires nothing less than our highest good: conformity to the character of His Son. A dynamic relationship with the truth of His Word provides us with the spiritual nourishment we will need to grow into the maturity of Christlikeness.

2. New priorities and values. The study of Scripture can deliver us from the bondage of a temporal perspective and provide us with an eternal value system. By frequently renewing our minds with the Word (Rom. 12:2), our thinking and behavior come more into conformity with God’s view of significance, purpose, identity, and success. The pursuit of God’s value system leads to fulfillment and joy in contrast to the frustration and unhappiness that result from the pursuit of the world’s value system. See Psalm 5:11; 16:5-8; 105:3-4; Jeremiah 9:23-24; Matthew 6:33; 2 Corinthians 4:16-18; 2 Corinthians 4:16-18; Colossians 1:10-12.

3. Overcoming temptation.
The study of Scripture provides us with both corrective and preventive medicine. It warns us in advance of the kinds of temptations we can expect (e.g., Prov. 4:10-27; 5:1-23; 1 John 2:15-16), tells us about the process of temptation (see Jas. 1:12-17), and shows us how to deal with temptation (1 Cor. 10:13; Eph. 6:10-18).

4. Guidance for decision making. The Scriptures reveal God’s moral will for practically every area of life. A working knowledge of the commands, prohibitions, and principles of the Bible will give us wisdom and guidance in the decisions that shape the course of our earthly existence (Ps. 119:105; Prov. 1:2-5), and a divine perspective that will enable us to respond in the right way to our circumstances and rise above them (Jas. 1:5).

5. Knowledge of God.
The Bible is a progressive revelation of the person, plan, character, mind, love, and will of our Creator. We cannot hope to know Him and His ways apart from time spent in His revealed Word.

All but three verses in Psalm 119 contain a reference to the Word of God (variously referred to as God’s laws, decrees, precepts, promises, testimonies, statutes, judgments, ordinances, commands, and words). When reading this psalm,  note the beneficial effects of the Scriptures in cultivating a relationship with God.

6. Knowledge of ourselves.
For the word of God is living and active, sharper than any two-edged sword, piercing to the division of soul and of spirit, of joints and of marrow, and discerning the thoughts and intentions of the heart.” (Heb. 4:12). The Bible cuts below the facade of appearances and lays bare our secret motivations and plans (cf. 1 Sam. 16:7). As we read it, the Word becomes a mirror that exhibits our true character, exposes areas of self-delusion, and exhorts us to change (see Jas. 1:21-25).

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5 responses to “6 Reasons for Getting Into the Word of God

  1. This is such a great read Don –

    I agree wholeheartedly that “Scripture is indeed “profitable for teaching,” but its profit does not stop on the level of doctrine; it must move from the head to the heart to accomplish the purpose for which it was given.”

    Many in the more ‘reformed evangelical’ camp can fall victim to this more so than those in the more – charismatic “experience reigns surpreme” camp.

  2. Thanks, Matthew.

    I like your warning that “it must move from the head to the heart to accomplish the purpose for which it was given.”

    I think that I covered this when I wrote, “A working knowledge of the commands, prohibitions, and principles of the Bible will give us wisdom and guidance in the decisions that shape the course of our earthly existence…”

    I agree wholeheartedly that head knowledge alone should not be the objective of the student of the Bible.

  3. A wise man once suggested that there is actually little difference in substance between the mind of a Calvinist and the mind of an Arminian. They simply sit at opposite ends of the spectrum of logic. When I think about that, I think he’s right. Why do so many professional teachers end up in the pulpit … they are conveying information … but thats about it! The work of God is LIVING, it is SHARP, it PIERCES, and it DIVIDES. It does something more than increase a stock of facts and the logic which connects those facts. It is more essential than our food and drink. Until the Word grips us, it is just a tool on our hands that we might argue about and discuss the finer point of. FInally, it is given to guide our way forward. The Word is for pilgrims, not for armchair critics!
    We should never underestimate the power of the word. It is like radioactivity – it may seem innocuous, but spend to much time near it, and you will get burned and ultimately die .. no bad thing at all, if you hear what Paul says.

    • Until the Word grips us, it is just a tool on our hands that we might argue about and discuss the finer point of. FInally, it is given to guide our way forward. The Word is for pilgrims, not for armchair critics!

      Well said, David. This is something about which we must all be mindful. I must confess it is very easy to slip into the “armchair mode”. We must always keep James 1:22 in mind; “But be doers of the word, and not hearers only, deceiving yourselves.”

  4. I agree with the part yo said “The Bible was not merely written for our information, but for our transformation” Thanks for the post.

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